Bacon: It's not too late to earn diploma, switch careers

Posted by: Jordan Wallace  | Friday, August 14, 2020

There are more than 105,000 in-demand jobs ranging in salaries from $30,000 to $90,000 that require at least a high school diploma. WorkINdiana allows Hoosiers to earn a high school equivalency diploma or improve their skills in an Adult Education classroom, and earn a career certificate giving them the skills they need to get the job they want. 

Indiana's Adult Education programs provide math, reading and writing instruction free of charge. WorkINdiana classes are approximately 14 weeks long with a total of about 40 hours. To find out more, connect with a nearby WorkOne Career Center or adult education provider in your county at IN.gov/DWD/adulted.htm.

Given the negative effects of the pandemic and many Hoosiers are still left without jobs, now may be the right time to jumpstart your education to earn a diploma while training for a better-paying career. There are over 30 certifications to choose from in fields like advanced manufacturing, business administration, construction, health care, hospitality, information technology, or transportation and logistics.

For Hoosiers with on-the-job experience, a high school diploma or a post-graduate degree wanting to make a career change, IndianaCareerReady.com is another resource to use. This free website provides customized training tools and access to a job portal.

There are employment opportunities out there, and it's never too late to learn a new trade. For questions about WorkINdiana, email WorkINdiana@dwd.in.gov, and I wish you the best of luck on your new journey.

As Indiana's economy and hard-working families bounce back from the impacts of COVID-19, it's critical that Hoosiers have access to education and training that opens doors to better-paying, high-demand jobs. If you or someone you know could benefit from one of these programs, please help spread the word.

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State Rep. Ron Bacon (R-Chandler) represents House District 75, 
which includes portions of Warrick, Pike and Spencer counties.

Click here to download a high-resolution photo.