Negele: House supports bill helping ‘revenge porn’ victims

Posted by: Jessica Bruder  | Tuesday, April 2, 2019

STATEHOUSE (April 2, 2019) – The House of Representatives voted in support of legislation sponsored by State Rep. Sharon Negele (R-Attica) providing justice to Hoosiers whose intimate photos are shared without their consent.

Also known as “revenge porn,” nonconsensual pornography is the distribution of intimate images without consent from the individual in the photo, often with the intent to humiliate or shame them.

“Individuals who share these photos do so in confidence,” Negele said. “It is never acceptable to share these images with others without the person’s consent. Victims of this heinous act deserve justice. By creating an avenue for them to pursue legal action, we can help deter others from sharing intimate photos unlawfully.”

According to Negele, there is currently no clear path for a victim to file a civil action. Under this legislation, nonconsensual pornography would be added to the list of potential causes an individual may file a civil action case on. Negele said this would outline a straightforward path for victims seeking compensation.

In 2016, the Data and Society Research Institute and the Center for Innovative Public Health Research found 1 in 25 Americans have been a victim of revenge porn.

Senate Enrolled Act 192 is now eligible for action by the governor. For more information, visit iga.in.gov.

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State Rep. Sharon Negele (R-Attica) represents House District 13, which includes all of Benton County, 
and portions of Fountain, Jasper, Montgomery, Newton, Tippecanoe, Warren and White counties.

CAPTION: State Rep. Sharon Negele (R-Attica) presents legislation she is sponsoring to provide justice to Hoosiers whose intimate photos are shared without their consent Monday, April 1, 2019, at the Statehouse. Under this legislation, nonconsensual pornography, also known as “revenge porn,” would be added to the list of potential causes an individual may file a civil action case on. After a unanimous vote of support in the House, the bill could soon become law.