Frye’s school safety legislation could soon be law

Frye’s school safety legislation could soon be law

Posted by: Abigail Campbell  | Friday, April 5, 2019 9:00 am

STATEHOUSE (April 5, 2019) — The Indiana House recently voted in support of State Rep. Randy Frye’s (R-Greensburg) legislation that would bolster school safety by equipping schools with emergency response kits.

Under this legislation, public schools could place “Stop the Bleed” kits on walls to ensure school staff members are better prepared to handle emergency situations. The kits would consist of instructional documents, a tourniquet endorsed by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care, bandages and other medical materials.

“Stop the Bleed” is a nationwide initiative encouraging bystanders to become trained, equipped and empowered to help in a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives.

“These kits could aid in anything from accidents on the playground to a rare active shooter situation,” Frye said. “This legislation would ensure school staff is not left helpless while waiting for first responders.”

According to Frye, at least five employees at each school would need to be trained to use the kits. Local fire departments have expressed support for training school employees and the Indiana Hospital Association offered to donate the kits to start the program.

House Enrolled Act 1063 will now go to the governor for further consideration. For more information, visit iga.in.gov.

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State Rep. Randy Frye (R-Greensburg) represents House District 67,

Ohio, Ripley and Switzerland counties, as well as portions of

Decatur, Jennings, Jefferson and Dearborn counties

PHOTO CAPTION: State Rep. Randy Frye (R-Greensburg) presents his legislation that would bolster school safety in Indiana Thursday, April 4, 2019, at the Statehouse in Indianapolis. His bill would give schools the option to place Stop the Bleed kits, like the one he is holding, in schools to be used in the event of an emergency. After today’s House concurrence, Frye’s bill now heads to the governor for consideration as a new law.